Geography & Maps

Geography & Maps

Dąbrówka

10.) Dąbrówka pod Barcinem, a manor in Szubin county; covers 1,788 morgas [a morga or mórg ranges between some 26 to 56 sq. km. -in this case probably 26 sq. km.]; post office in Barcin, 4 km. away; railway station 15 km. away in Broniewice (Amsee).

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1880, vol. 1, p.938]

 

This translation, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the Summer 1996 issue of "Bulletin of the Polish Genealogical Society of America".

Dąbrówka


 Dawidgródek

Dawidhorodok, An ancient settlement on islands along the Horynia river (above the Nieprawda river), along the trade route between Mozyrza and Pinsk. Today it is a town and estate located in the western part of the Mozyr powiat (district) within the 3rd Police precinct, 3rd court precinct, 3rd military precinct of Turowski about 160 verst from Mozyr. From 1586, the town belonged to the Radziwill family which was given to them by Zygmunt August. For a period of time the town belonged to the Kleck precinct, however, in 1875 it was included in the Nieswieskiej precinct. After the Minsk gubernia was established in 1795 the town was governed until 1796 as a Russian powiat (district). The Catholic church named “Holy Body” was established in 1624 and paid for by Jan Radziwill. The Catholic deanery of Pinsk has 1446 members, with a parish in Turow and chapels in Kozangródek and Lachow. There are about 4000 inhabitants who are gardeners producing vegetables, who prepare dried fish that are plentiful, tending the fields and are famous for leather shoemaking. The estate has 6860 meters of land. It is famous for Olive gardens, its good earth and good climate.

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, pg. 914]

 

This translation, by Donald A. Szumowski, is used by permission.


Dewergi

Dewergi, Dziewergi-- [ed.-- no reference in Toms I-XIV] 1) a peasant village in Oszmiana province, within the gmina and treasury estate of Bakszty (lying 6 miles away). In the 1865 tax census, 109 residents were identified. Editor's Note: All Slownik longitudes in this article have been converted to modern coordinates which is based on the Greenwich zero meridian. All Polish measurement units (land areas, distances, height above sea level, etc.) were converted to American-English equivalents. Monetary units, where identified, were left in zlotys/zl. or rubles/rs.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1902, vol. 15, pt. 1, p. 406]

This translation, by Mike Gansecki, is used by permission.


 Dłutowo

Dlutowo, a village on the river Dzialdówka, Mlawa powiat, Zielun gmina, Dlutowo parish. It has a wooden parish church, a chapel, and a windmill; the church is said to have been built in 1785. In 1827 there were 42 houses and 301 inhabitants in Dlutowo; at present [i.e., when the Slownik was compiled] it has 56 houses, 52 buildings, and 614 inhabitants. The Dlutowo estate consists of the villages of Wawrowo, Konopaty, Zielun, and Ruda; it has a surface area of 6,203 mórgs, including 2,385 of farmland and 1,182 of land belonging to the peasants. Dlutowo parish, of Mlawa deanery, numbers 2,088 souls.  

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p. 41]

 

This translation, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the Spring 1998 issue of "Bulletin of the Polish Genealogical Society of America".


Dmytrowice

1.) a village in the Przemysl district; it is situated 12 km to the north of Przemysl; 9.4 km to the southwest of Radymno; 2 km to the northeast of Kosienice. The major estate has 346 morga of farmland, 70 of meadows and gardens, 6 of pastureland, 143 of forest. The minor estate has 284 morga of farmland, 30 of meadows and gardens, 12 of pastureland, 1 of forest. Inhabitants: 50 Roman Catholics, 228 Greek Catholics, 70 Jews. Total number of inhabitants: 348. The village belongs to the Roman-Catholic parish in the village of Kosienice; and to the Greek-Catholic parish in the village of Zamiechow. The village is very old. Hungarian historical documents (donatives) from the year of 1383 reference the name of Dmytrowice. The major estate is the property of a woman whose name is Salomea Runge (her maiden name is Rozborska).

 

2.) a village in the Lwow district which is situated 272 metres above the sea level; 14 km to the southeast of Lwow; 5 km to the southeast of the post office in Winniki. The Roman-Catholic parish located in Czyszki; the Greek-Catholic parish loco; 87 houses; 469 inhabitants; the manorial estate has 381 morga of farmland, 114 of meadows and gardens, 68 of pastureland; peasants have 494 morgsof farmland, 158 of meadows and gardens, 76 of pastureland; there  is a one-class elementary school and a gmina loan society with the capital of 1.605 Polish zloty; the village belongs to Count Wladyslaw Borkowski.

 

3.) Dmytrowice ~ Łoś; a village in Mościska district, situated at the stream called Wisznia; 3.8 km to the south of Sądowa-Wisznia; 18 km to the southeast of Mościska; the major estate has 293 morgs of farmland, 167 of meadows and gardens, 47 of pastureland, 393 of forest; the minor estate has 764 morga of farmland, 102 of meadows and gardens, 70 of pastureland, 30 of forest; inhabitants: 120 Roman Catholics, 862 Greek Catholics (the inhabitants of the neighbouring hamlets of  Koniuszki, Zarzecze, Kąt, Zagrody are included), 47 Jews; total number of inhabitants: 1029; the village belongs to the Roman-Catholic parish in Sądowa Wisznia, the Greek-Catholic parish loco; the village belongs to the deanery of Sądowa-Wisznia; the village of Dydiatycze (530 persons) and the village of Kułmatyce (223 persons) belong to the Greek Catholic parish in Dmytrowice; there is an elementary school with one teacher in the village; the major estate belongs to Countess Walerya Łoś who is married to Count Łączyński.

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p.44]

 

This translation, by Jaromir Iwanciow, is used by permission.


Dołobów (now Dolobuv, Ukraine)

Dołobów, Dołubów, a village, in the county of Rudki, it lies near the river Strwiąż, about 3 kilometers on the west of the Strwiąż outlet to the Dniestr, about 7.5 kilometers south of Rudki, in a lowly, wetly, swampy area, about 4 kilometers west of the governmental guest house hosting (officials) from Rudki to Sambor.  Expanse of the major estate:  cultivable farmland 105, meadows and gardens 1,048, pastureland 32, forests 818; the minor estate:  cultivable farmland 232, meadows and gardens 22, pastureland 82, forest 13 mórgi.  Population of 95 Roman Catholics, 165 Greek Catholics and 13 Jews:  Total 273.  It belongs to the Roman Catholic parish in Rudki, the Greek Catholic parish in Nowosiołki Gościnne.  In the village is a savings association with company funds of 92 Rhenish Złoty.  The owner of the major estate is Ludwik Skrzyński.  In order to divert the Dniestr waters from Koniuszki, where it formerly united with the Strwiąż at a right angle, a canal was carved (dug) through the Sambor mud.  This canal, known as the Dołubów, begins from Hordynia and returns again to the Dniestr near the Dołubów (canal), encompassing a span of around 5,000 sążeń, but not completely effected either with purpose or expectations. Admittedly, with its help it succeeded, in diverting (water) out of the Dniestr channel from Koniuszki and averted a perpendicular connection built around this river.  When (the waters of) this canal lead to an outlet in the level valley and its waters flowed toward the lower territory, a point which formerly was not accessible even during the highest flood, today stands under water from the overflowing Dniestr.             Bolesław Rozwadowski,  Wielka Polska 

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p. 108]

 

This translation, by Anthony Paddock, is used by permission.


Domaradz

Domaradz, or Domaradzów, with Plosina, Katy, Krzywe, Zatyle, and Poremby, a village in Brzozów powiat, on the Brzozówka, a tributary of the Wislok (Stobnica?), at 49°48' north, 39°37 east from Ferro [would be about 21°57' by the coordinates used as standard today], 13 km. northwest of Brzozów, 6 km. north of the post office in Jasienica. There is a Roman Catholic parish in the village, a Greek Catholic parish in Izdebki. There are 495 houses in Domaradz along with Plosina, Katy and Zatyle, and 2,653 inhabitants. The major estate covers 276 mórgs of farmland, 54 of meadows and gardens, 32 of pastures, and 444 of forests; the minor estate has 2,523 mórgs of farmland, 388 of meadows and gardens, 242 of pastures, and 344 of forests. In the village there is a 1-class state school, a savings society with a capital of 300 Rhenish zl., and a large brewing factory. The major estate belongs to the Latin bishops [Latin-rite or Roman Catholic, as opposed to Greek Catholic] of Przemysl. The pedagogue Maksymilian Lyszkowski was born in Domaradz. The first trace of the founding of a parish here is in records from 1510; Jan Dziaduski, Bishop of Przemysl, renewed its funding in 1545; whereas in 1542 Stanislaw Tarlo consecrated the church, under the patronage of St. Mikolaj, Bishop; but that church, as best we can judge, is not the same as the one existing today. In 1523 Jan Krzysztof Szembek, Bishop of Przemysl, incorporated the benefice in Domaradz into the collegiate chapter in Brzozów. There are 2,452 Catholics in the parish, 45 Jews. - B. R.

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, pp. 113-114]

 

This translation, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the Winter 1999 issue of "Bulletin of the Polish Genealogical Society of America".


Dręstwo

Dręstwo, village on the lake of the same name, in Szczuczyn powiat, Pruska gmina, Barglowo parish, with 994 mórgs of land. In 1827 Drestwo had 38 houses, 288 inhabitants.

 

Dręstwo, Rybczyzna or Woznowiejskie, a lake in Szczuczyn powiat, northeast of Rajgród, stretches 7.5 km. from southwest to northeast, between the villages of Wozna wies and Rybczyzna, goes around the village of Drestwo, touches the grounds of Rajgród and of the villages of Barszcze and Solistówka to the north. Its area is 180 mórgs, and its banks are primarily wooded and boggy. The river Jegrznia flows through it and connects Lake Drestwo to Lake Rajgródzkie. - Br. Ch. [Bronislaw Chleboski] 

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p. 145]

 

This translation, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the Winter 1998 issue of "Bulletin of the Polish Genealogical Society of America".


Dudy

1) a small town in the 3rd police district of Oszmiana province within the Logumowicze gmina. It lies 4.6 mi. northwest from Ivie, 5.3 mi. to Nikolaev, 68 mi. to Wilno, and 42 mi. to Oszmiana. This town of 210 inhabitants is situated at the junction of the Nieman and Dudzianka rivers, and possesses a wooden Catholic church founded in 1772 by the landowner Zienko. Affiliated with Iwje parish, it numbers 2,784 parishioners. Unhappy ancient Dudites petitioned the Voivod of Wilno for a new location near the Dudy estate (Maly Dudy). Up to 1760, Dudy was owned by Zienkowicz, then sold off as as an unprofitable term. In 1866 the town had 12 homes, 68 Catholic inhabitants and 12 Jews. Today the town and estate is partly owned by the Treasury, partly by Weronik Korwin-Milewski.

 

Additional Slownik information on Dudy from Volume XV]: 

Dudy- 5) a small town on the Dudzianka River flowing directly into the Nieman, lying in Oszmiana province. The sheriff's domain in 1608 was in the possession of Karol Chodkiewicz, Voivod of Wilno, who in the same year left a significant legacy to the existing Catholic church in Dudy. Zienkowicz erected the present church in 1772. The Sheriff of Dudy in 1653 was Theodore Doenhoff. To the sheriff s domain at the time belonged: the mansion and hamlet of Logumowicze (possibly at times a separate sheriff's domain; it is uncertain why it was called "Totewski's Domain") [ed-- note difference in spelling from a related Logomowicze entry], Bojarosze, Czerniewicze, Czatunowicze, Osoczniki, Pieniewicze [ed-- also looks like a misspelling of Piesiewicze], Lezniewicze, Moncewicze, Cieczerniki, Boczeczniki, Winkszniahy, Inkielewicze and Jurkiewicze. Upon the death of Doenhoff in 1665, the Dudy sheriff's domain fell into the possession of Jan Casimir Horbaczewski, Master of the Pantry of the Polish-Lithuanian Republic. In 1720, Marian Wollowicz was Sheriff, as well as Marshal of the Lithuanian army; he transferred ownership to his wife Antonina (nee Zahorowski). It was once again abandoned to the holder of entail (as a debt?) Tomas Zamojski. Zamojski transferred the sheriff's domain to Christof Pac, Castellan of Polotsk. On the death of Pac in 1725, Antoni Bojnicki, Cup-Bearer of Polotsk acquired the domain, and his wife Teofila (nee Zeronski) governed it there as if a life-time property from 1736 until 1749. At that time, the sheriff's domain comprised 4,350 acres and counted 187 families. In 1789, Jerome and Barbara (nee Sulistrowski) Zienkowicz acquired it. Belonging at that time to the domain were: the town of Dudy, the Logomowicze estate, while belonging to the sheriff's mansion were: Macewicze farmstead (today Moncewicze) and the following villages: Logomowicze, Lezniewicze, Ciecierniki (today a farm), Piesniewicze, Koziewicze, Czierniewicze, Galonowicze (today Galunowicze), Bajrasze, Lebuki (no longer extant), and Jurkowicze (today a farm). The Dudy sheriff's domain contributed revenues of 13,567 Polish zlotys, of which half went to the Commonwealth treasury. Dudy's Catholic church is a parish affiliate of Ivie, called the "Birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary", constructed of wood. The affiliate church has 3,006 parishioners.

 

Editor's Note: All Slownik longitudes in this article have been converted to modern coordinates which is based on the Greenwich zero meridian. All Polish measurement units (land areas, distances, height above sea level, etc.) were converted to American-English equivalents.  Monetary units, where identified, were left in zlotys/zl. or rubles/rs.

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p.208; 1902, vol. 15, p.450]

 

This translation, by Mike Gansecki, is used by permission.


Dunaj

Dunaj-- (or Donaj)-- 2) a village in Oszmiana province within the gmina and estate of Iwie (6.6 miles away). It had 89 inhabitants according to the 1865 tax census.

 

Editor's Note: All Slownik longitudes in this article have been converted to modern coordinates which is based on the Greenwich zero meridian. All Polish measurement units (land areas, distances, height above sea level, etc.) were converted to American-English equivalents.  Monetary units, where identified, were left in zlotys/zl. or rubles/rs.

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1902, vol. 15, p.452]

 

This translation, by Mike Gansecki, is used by permission.


Dylewo-nowe

village, Ostrołęka powiat, Dylewo gmina, Kadzidlo parish.  In 1827 there were 35 houses there and 210 inhabitants; it currently has 1,362 mórgs of land. 

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, Vol. 2, p.245]

Dylewo-stare

village, and Dylewo Dwór, folwark, Ostrołęka powiat, Dylewo gmina, Kadzidlo parish.  The gmina office is here.  In 1827 54 houses were counted here and 294 inhabitants; it currently covers 1,334 mórgs. Dylewo gmina has a population of 5,263, covering 18,611 mórgs, and the gmina court, district I, is in Kadzidlo, 6 wiorstas away; the post office is in Ostrołęka, 13 wiorstas away. The gmina includes: Chudek, Czarnostrzew, Dylewo-nowe, D.-stare, Gleba, Jeglewiec, Kadzidlo, Kamienowizna, Karaska, Kierzek, Kuczynskie, Lodziska, Obierwia, Olszewka, Piasecznia, Siarki, Strzalki, Szafarnia, Szarczalaka, and Szwedrowy Most, all peasant villages. The rural people (namely in Dylewo) produce linen [or "cloth"].

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, Vol. 2, p. 245]

 

These translations, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the November 1998 and Winter 1996-1997 issues of "Bulletin of the Polish Genealogical Society of America" respectively.


Działdowo

Działdowo, German Soldau, a town in Niborsk powiat [now called "Nidzica, " in German "Kreis Neidenburg"], East Prussia, in a marshy area which took its name from the town, on the highway to Lidzbark, Nibork and Dabrówno. It is a little more than 3½ km. from the [border of the] Congress Kingdom, 15 km. from Nibork. It has a fortified castle that was established in 1306 by the Teutonic Knights. The town was built in 1349, and at the time of its establishment possessed an area of 30 wlókas, in addition to other, smaller properties.

Działdowo, along with the entire region, has been populated since time immemorial. One still comes across numerous pagan burial sites. Until quite recently one could see burial mounds in almost every village; called Capornen (?) in German, they reached a height of four meters. In the nearby village of Koszelewki (in German Klein Koschlau) 15 stone circles (Steinrundberge) were found, within which there were numerous burial urns. The Teutonic Knights' wójts (German Vögte) who administered the area had their seats at the the castle. In addition to Działdowo and the castle and folwark, their jurisdiction included: 111 feudal estates, 66 of them established on terms of Chelmno law (Kölmische Dienste) and 34 Old Prussian; 11 German villages with 690 rental wlókas, no Prussian villages; two mills paying a rent of 210 bushels of rye; and 11 rural parsonages.

Działdowo suffered a great deal during the wars, first during that of the Teutonic Knights and Lithuanians in 1377. In 1409 it was burned down by the Lithuanians. A year later, after the victory at Grünwald, it was given by Wladyslaw Jagiello to the Mazovian prince Ziemowit; soon after it was won back by the Knights. In 1454 when all of Prussia joined with Poland as its fatherland, the local inhabitants expelled the Knights manning the castle and surrendered to Poland. In 1455 the Teutonic Knights regained the castle. Then Jan Koldaczek of Jagiello's army, having invented for himself the title of Elblag Commander of the Knights, entered Działdowo, took the castle, and burned down the city. The Swedish King Karl Gustav had his headquarters in Działdowo in 1656. In 1737 and 1748 Działdowo again experienced heavy damage due to fires.

At present Działdowo has about 3,000 inhabitants, and has a Lutheran church taken from the Catholics during the Reformation, as well as, a post office, and a telegraph station. The Knights' castle is still fairly well preserved. In 1701 King Friedrich gave the castle chapel to the local Protestant congregation for their use. From the very beginning of the Reformation, Catholics were deprived of services. It was not until 1858 that a mission station was founded there, which by 20 January 1860 had already been named as a separate parish. The newly-built church was consecrated by the Chelmno bishop at the time, Jan Nepomucen Marwicz, on 17 August 1862; he gave it the name of St. Wojciech [in German or English "Albert" or "Adalbert"]. The Działdowo parish has 1,730 souls, 450 of them in the town; 40 villages belong to it, and it is in the newly created deanery of Pomezania (in the ancient territory of that name), of Chelmno diocese, under the auspices of the bishop. In addition to the Lutheran schools in the town there is also a private Catholic school, supported by contributions from the Diocesan Society of St. Wojciech and St. Boniface, which also support the pastor.

Local industry and trades are fairly healthy; there is a woolen cloth factory, workshops for cloth, hides, and so on. Near the town there are springs of iron mineral water and iron ore mines. There are numerous fairs: four a year for cattle, two for sheep, two for cloth, and four with stalls. Rev. Frydrychowitcz

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, pp. 262-263]

 

This translation, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the Spring 1998 issue of "Bulletin of the Polish Genealogical Society of America".


Dziecmierowo

a village and manor farm in the Śrem district; the manor has 1112 acres (morgs), 24 houses, 302 people, all Catholic, 122 cannot read. The manor belongs to the area of Kornik and the owner is Działynski. The post office is in Kornik about 2 kilometers away; the train station is in Gądki about 6 kilometers away.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p.269]

 

Submitted by Joseph F. Martin.  Translated by Malgorzata Biela. Used by permission.


Dziewa

village and district, Inowroclaw county; 3 localities: 1) Dziewa a village; 2) Dziewa, an estate, 1,143 mórgs in size; 3) Czajka, an inn, 8 houses, 115 inhabitants, 11 Protestant, 104 Catholic, 55 illiterate.   The postal station is at Papros, on the border of the Kingdom of Poland, 5 km. away, and the railway station is at Inowroclaw, 14 km. away.  Formerly the property of J. Sobeski.
M. St.

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p.289]

 

This translation, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the Summer 1998 issue of "Bulletin of the Polish Genealogical Society of America".


Dziewieniszki

Dziewieniszki- (Russ. Dewieniszki) is a small government town in Oszmiana province on the Gawia River, which is navigable up to Dziewieniszki. The town lies 20 miles southwest of Oszmiana, 42 mi from Wilno and 8 mi. to the Subotniki post office, being located at 54° 12'N and 25° 17'E . It belongs to the 4th peace court from Lipniszki in the 2nd Lida District and is both a province [ed--. 3rd police district of Oszmiana] and gmina administrative district town. The town has a rural school and a wooden structure Catholic church affiliated with Gieranony. The affiliate parish has 4,023 parishioners. Dziewieniszki was once the possession of the famous Gasztold family, on the strength of rights and privileges granted by the Lithuanian Grand Duke Zygmunt Mejstut in 1433. There is still an estate based on this grant. In 1500 a member of the family became the Voivod of Wilno and founded the Catholic Church there.

 

Upon the death of Stanislaus, the last Gasztold, Dziewieniszki was donated to King Sigismund in 1542 and Dziewieniszki became a sheriff's domain. By 1712 it counted 49 homes, and in 1782 came into the possession of Jodki, Marshal of Lida, who paid the army tax of 1,184 zlotys. The greater part of this grant constituting the sheriff's domain consisted of assigned peasants called "ordinary inhabitants", while the remainder consisted of about 270 acres of arable land, reserved for [ed.- **Nazaretski** untranslated, possibly Nazarene(?)] government officials. The 843 peasants of Dziewieniszki predominantly speak Lithuanian and are known for their carpentry in addition to agricultural work. The town is in the hands of the Jews, a Dominion people, who from time immemorial have provided commerce and taverns at a decent profit. Biannually, they put on great market fairs at the houses of St. Jerzy and Sts Michael. The Dziewieniszki peasant gmina consists of 9 rural districts containing 90 villages, 602 homes, and 5,796 inhabitants within their limits.

 

Editor's Note: All Slownik longitudes in this article have been converted to modern coordinates which is based on the Greenwich zero meridian. All Polish measurement units (land areas, distances, height above sea level, etc.) were converted to American-English equivalents.  Monetary units, where identified, were left in zlotys/zl. or rubles/rs.

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, pp. 290-291]

 

This translation, by Mike Gansecki, is used by Permission.

 


Dziewierzewo

Dziewierzewo, 1.) A village in the powiat of Wagrowiecki containing 11 homes, 115 inhabitants, 105 Catholics, 10 Protestants , 49 illiterates. A Catholic Church is located here and belongs to the deanery of Lekinskiego. (Kalisz gubernia)

 

2.) D., A Dominion ( Manor Lindenbruck) 5669 morgs of cultivated lands and gardens, 10 homes 338 inhabitants, 20 Protestants, 318 Catholics 157 illiterates. There is a Post Office at Kcynia (Exin) about 5 km. distant, a railroad station at Osiek about 25 km. distant. Together with Graboszewo the property of the Moszczenski family. M. St.[udniarski]

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p.291]

 

This translation, by Jim Piechorowski, is used by permission.


Dżwierzchno

Magnate lands

 

53 .  Dzwierzchno Male- Sobeski
54 .  Dzwierzchno Wielke- Sobeski

 

Translated Entry

 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1881, vol. 2, p.305]

 

This translation, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the Summer 1998 issue of "Bulletin of the Polish Genealogical Society of America".