Select the search type
  • Site
  • Web
Search
Herbarz Polski translation

Bartlinski herb

The following article is a direct translation from the classic Genealogical and Heraldic reference "Herbarz Polski" by Kasper Niesiecki S.J., (Lipsk) edition 1839-46.

 

An owl, its beak directed to the right, with wings in an upstroke position, stands on a stump which has a knot on either side. It is similar to Korwin's except that it has no ring and has a different shape.

 

The widow, Anna Rembowska, ordered that this inherited coat of arms be inscribed on her friend Bartlinski's marble tombstone which she had placed in the church of the Cistercian Fathers in Pelplin. I have been unable to trace the origin of this coat of arms. Konopatski mentions a Jerzy Bartlinski, land judge of Tczewsk, married to Regina Wiesiolowska, sister of the Castellan of Elblag, who had two daughters, Maryann and Alexandra, and two sons, Lenard and Jerzy. In 1643, one of this family, a deputy voivode of Pomerania, out of love for the Mother of God, left a memento of silver beside Her picture in Sierpsk, with which miracles are associated. Wojciech and Jan of Pomerania and Marcin from Czerniewo, voted to elect Wladyslaw IV. (Paprocki). Tyburcy Bartlinski, cupbearer of the crown, married Maryann Wieloglowska. Neither Paprocki nor Okolski writes about them.

 

In his annotations, Krasicki adds:

 

Bartlinski is given the cognomen, de Walenbach, in a manuscript on Prussian families (Helbsk.) and in it the coat of arms is described as a black starling on the stump of an oak with five roots and two branches, in a field of deep blue. The starling's wings are in an upstroke as tho he were landing. This coat of arms is also in the church in Pelplin, in a window, differing only in that the stump stands diagonally.

 

The Bartlinskis of Pomerania/ Pomorze are chivalrous, hospitable, and virtuous. One of them serves Prince Radziwill in Gniew. He is a man of splendid courage and humanity. Married Brzeska whose coat of arms is Ciolek.

 

Copyright © 1982 Josephine M. Piegzik. Used by permission. This article originally appeared in Polish Genealogical Society Newsletter  (Vol. 4, No. 1, Spring 1982), the journal of the Polish Genealogical Society (of America).

  
Copyright 2008-2016 Version 7.04.01 by PolishRoots   |  Privacy Statement  |  Terms Of Use